Linford Miller

Overview

Miller’s perseverance
.... got Hall of Fame rolling again

Past President of the Sportsmen's Athletic Club and the Cricket Hall of Fame

When Linford Miller, a former officer in the Jamaica police force migrated to Hartford, he had no idea that he would become involved with the promotion of the game of cricket. However, as faith was to have it, he became associated with the Sportmen’s Athletic Club and discovered that it was the home of the first and at the time only Cricket hall of fame in the world.

Although he does not play the game, as a lover of the sport, he became interested in trying to get the once vibrant organization, which had remained dormant for a period of years, rolling again. Miller did not let his feelings known at the time, but when he became president of the club, he said that he began to get calls from all over the world inquiring about the Hall of Fame. These queries Miller said, made him even more determined to get the institution revived. As a result, he began to canvas all the people whom he could find that had a role in its formation, seeking their help to get it started again. None of them showed any interest. “I did not give there,” he said, “but continued to approach them until former president of the club, Michael Chambers, who was one of the main catalyst in its formation, finally decided that he would give it a try.”

With the help of former Jamaica estate cricket star, Joslyn Chance Sr., Chambers was able to come up with the names of a few interested people from whom a committee was formed to get the Hall of Fame back in motion. Some of the people have since dropped out, he said, but the present operation of the organization is testimony of what he had dreamed that he would like to see happen.

Under Chambers’ direction the Hall of Fame has once again been transformed into a vibrant organization that is regaining the confidence and respect of the cricketers and the community. Miller said that it is his dream to see the Hall of Fame become the headquarters for cricket in Connecticut and listed in the state’s tourism booklet as an attraction for visitors. This is slowly becoming a reality as along with the annual Six-a-Side tournament, the Hall of Fame is now responsible for the coordination of a Saturday League and a Master’s competition. It has also been approached to assist in the setting up and running of an Inter-Island tournament among cricketers in Connecticut, a competition that could well become a big event in the state. “These competitions fall in line with the Hall of Fame’s objective of helping in the development and growth of the game in the U.S.,” he said.

The revived Hall of Fame has also become a strong advocate of charitable causes in the community. Responding to an appeal made by the Consul General of Jamaica, Dr. Basil K. Bryan, the Hall of Fame raised more than 400,000 surgical gloves to assist health workers in Jamaica who are involved in the care of AIDS afflicted infants. And at its first Humanitarian Award program held on Saturday, May 6, more than $5,000 in pledges was raised for the Boys’ Town project in Jamaica. The Boy Scouts’ movement in the island will also benefit from the event.

With the Hall of Fame now holding its own, Miller who said that he is committed to the community has taken on another challenge, that of the president of the Hartford Carnival Committee. Formerly the West Indian Independence Celebration Committee, Miller said that he hopes to bring the annual event on par with all the other carnivals in the world.

“My decision to take on the leadership of the carnival committee does not mean that I have given up my interest in the Hall of Fame. I am confident that it will succeed and will soon be able to resume its prestigious induction ceremonies.”

The revived Hall of Fame has also become a strong advocate of charitable causes in the community. Responding to an appeal made by the Consul General of Jamaica, Dr. Basil K. Bryan, the Hall of Fame raised more than 400,000 surgical gloves to assist health workers in Jamaica who are involved in the care of AIDS afflicted infants. And at its first Humanitarian Award program held on Saturday, May 6, more than $5,000 in pledges was raised for the Boys’ Town project in Jamaica. The Boy Scouts’ movement in the island will also benefit from the event.

With the Hall of Fame now holding its own, Miller who said that he is committed to the community has taken on another challenge, that of the president of the Hartford Carnival Committee. Formerly the West Indian Independence Celebration Committee, Miller said that he hopes to bring the annual event on par with all the other carnivals in the world.

“My decision to take on the leadership of the carnival committee does not mean that I have given up my interest in the Hall of Fame. I am confident that it will succeed and will soon be able to resume its prestigious induction ceremonies.”